What does mystery mean?

In the rite and worship of the Church there are some rites that are considered Sacraments (Catholic) or Mysteries (Gr.) (Arm. Khorhurd (Խորհուրդ)). The basis of all mysteries is the gospel of Jesus Christ. This does not mean, however, that Christ himself instituted all the mysteries or even laid down all the details of the rites during his earthly life. The mysteries and their message represent the basis of Jesus Christ's work of salvation and at the same time rest on the truths of the gospel.

The word "Khorhurd", in the religious-theological sense, means "the revelation of hidden things" (St. Gregory of Tatev, 14th century). The term is often used in the orthodox tradition "mystery" used. Many truths are secretly given to us by Scripture that we can only understand by faith. So, by mystery we mean the mysterious and divine truths that we cannot perceive with the ordinary eye, but can only see through the spiritual eye, that is, through faith. Through the celebration of the sacraments, the divine and the invisible are conveyed to the person concerned through visible forms and signs.

The Church continues the salvific work of Christ in the world. Christ is present in the world through the Church. The power of Christ is imparted to men through the administration of the mysteries through the Church. In the Armenian Church, the celebrant (priest, bishop, catholicos) does not use the first person in the dispensation of many mysteries (e.g. "I baptize..." or "I bless..."), but a passive formulation (e.g. "It will be baptized..." or "It will be blessed..."). This passive formulation makes it clear that God is the real giver of the mysteries. When donating, God's graces and gifts are asked for.

The Armenian Church, like the Catholic and Orthodox Church, knows seven mysteries, despite some theological and christological differences. Although the Armenian Church affirms the seven mysteries, it distances itself from the number seven, since, like the other Eastern Churches, it regards the entire Church and all ecclesiastical activities as mystery sees. According to the Armenian Patriarch of Constantinople, Archbishop Maghakia Ormanian, the number seven of the Mysteries was never a dogma for the Armenian Church, but rather a doctrinal point. Therefore he rejects the obligation of the number seven for the authentic Armenian teaching.

In the Armenian Church, the mysteries may only be administered by an ordained and anointed priest (married or celibate). The mystery of the laying on of hands or ordination to the priesthood is administered by a bishop or the Catholicos himself. The mysteries of baptism, anointing and consecration are unrepeatable. Baptism, anointing, penance and the Lord's Supper are the essential mysteries for every believer.

The seven mysteries of the Armenian Church are: Baptism, anointing, penance, Eucharist (Communion), coronation (marriage), laying on of hands (consecration), anointing of the sick or last rites.

In the rite and worship of the Church there are some rites that are considered Sacraments (Catholic) or Mysteries (Gr.) (Arm. Khorhurd (Խորհուրդ)). The basis of all mysteries is the gospel of Jesus Christ. This does not mean, however, that Christ himself instituted all the mysteries or even laid down all the details of the rites during his earthly life. The mysteries and their message represent the basis of Jesus Christ's work of salvation and at the same time rest on the truths of the gospel.

The word "Khorhurd", in the religious-theological sense, means "the revelation of hidden things" (St. Gregory of Tatev, 14th century). The term is often used in the orthodox tradition "mystery" used. Many truths are secretly given to us by Scripture that we can only understand by faith. So, by mystery we mean the mysterious and divine truths that we cannot perceive with the ordinary eye, but can only see through the spiritual eye, that is, through faith. Through the celebration of the sacraments, the divine and the invisible are conveyed to the person concerned through visible forms and signs.

The Church continues the salvific work of Christ in the world. Christ is present in the world through the Church. The power of Christ is imparted to men through the administration of the mysteries through the Church. In the Armenian Church, the celebrant (priest, bishop, catholicos) does not use the first person in the dispensation of many mysteries (e.g. "I baptize..." or "I bless..."), but a passive formulation (e.g. "It will be baptized..." or "It will be blessed..."). This passive formulation makes it clear that God is the real giver of the mysteries. When donating, God's graces and gifts are asked for.

The Armenian Church, like the Catholic and Orthodox Church, knows seven mysteries, despite some theological and christological differences. Although the Armenian Church affirms the seven mysteries, it distances itself from the number seven, since, like the other Eastern Churches, it regards the entire Church and all ecclesiastical activities as mystery sees. According to the Armenian Patriarch of Constantinople, Archbishop Maghakia Ormanian, the number seven of the Mysteries was never a dogma for the Armenian Church, but rather a doctrinal point. Therefore he rejects the obligation of the number seven for the authentic Armenian teaching.

In the Armenian Church, the mysteries may only be administered by an ordained and anointed priest (married or celibate). The mystery of the laying on of hands or ordination to the priesthood is administered by a bishop or the Catholicos himself. The mysteries of baptism, anointing and consecration are unrepeatable. Baptism, anointing, penance and the Lord's Supper are the essential mysteries for every believer.

The seven mysteries of the Armenian Church are: Baptism, anointing, penance, Eucharist (Communion), coronation (marriage), laying on of hands (consecration), anointing of the sick or last rites.